High stakes at Avengers Mansion.

Marvel Two-In-One #51, May 1979
Frank Miller, Bob McLeod,
and Peter Gillis

High stakes at Avengers Mansion.

Marvel Two-In-One #51, May 1979
Frank Miller, Bob McLeod,
and Peter Gillis

Hellcat kicks butt.


Defenders #70, April 1979
Herb Trimpe, Mike Esposito,
and Ed Hannigan

Hellcat kicks butt.


Defenders #70, April 1979
Herb Trimpe, Mike Esposito,
and Ed Hannigan

seanhowe:

The Man Who Colored The Marvel Universe:

Stan Goldberg (1932-2014)

Marvel colorist Stan Goldberg, who created the color schemes of the costumes of Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, and dozens of others, died yesterday, at the age of 82. Mark Evanier has more information here.


I wrote briefly, in Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, about two of Stan’s contributions to the Marvel mythos.

On The Fantastic Four:

And although they remained unmasked (in another break from comic-book convention, they were going to keep their identities public), at the urging of letter-writing fans they soon had snappy blue uniforms. “Jack gave them this long underwear with the letter ‘4’ on their chest,” said Stan Goldberg, who designed the color schemes of the Marvel comics. “I made the ‘4’ blue and kept a little area around it white, and then when the villains came in—the villains get the burnt umbers, dark greens, purples, grays, things like that—they can bounce off it.” The blast of colorful heroics against a murky background world immediately set Fantastic Four apart from everything else on the newsstand.

On Spider-Man:

The grand melodrama was offset by Lee’s snappy patter, Ditko’s stunning costume design, and, once again, the primary-color palette choices of Stan Goldberg, who selected for Spider-Man’s costume a combination of cherry red and dark cobalt (in deliberate contrast to the more vivacious azure of the Fantastic Four).

____

Goldberg also drew non-superhero comics for Marvel in its Timely incarnation, and was the longtime artist for Marvel’s Millie the Model series. In the late 1960s he began drawing for various series published by Archie Comics.

Re-absorbing and it feels so good.

Avengers #183, May 1979
John Byrne, Klaus Janson,
and David Michelinie

Re-absorbing and it feels so good.

Avengers #183, May 1979
John Byrne, Klaus Janson,
and David Michelinie

Carol Danvers joins the Avengers.

Avengers #183, May 1979
John Byrne, Klaus Janson,
and David Michelinie

Carol Danvers joins the Avengers.

Avengers #183, May 1979
John Byrne, Klaus Janson,
and David Michelinie

To smash a Machine Man.

Incredible Hulk #235, May 1979
Sal Buscema, Mike Esposito,
and Roger Stern

To smash a Machine Man.

Incredible Hulk #235, May 1979
Sal Buscema, Mike Esposito,
and Roger Stern

Skrull justice for all.

Fantastic Four #206, May 1979
Keith Pollard, Joe Sinnott,
and Marv Wolfman

Skrull justice for all.

Fantastic Four #206, May 1979
Keith Pollard, Joe Sinnott,
and Marv Wolfman

"I need one ticket to da doity show."

"I need one ticket to da doity show."

Celestials love toy airplanes!

Mighty Thor #283, May 1979
John Buscema, Chic Stone,
and Roy Thomas

Celestials love toy airplanes!

Mighty Thor #283, May 1979
John Buscema, Chic Stone,
and Roy Thomas

Indiana Mole and the Journey to the Center of the Earth.

Indiana Mole and the Journey to the Center of the Earth.

Alpha Flight is so polite!

Uncanny X-Men #121, May 1979
John Byrne, Terry Austin,
and Chris Claremont

Alpha Flight is so polite!

Uncanny X-Men #121, May 1979
John Byrne, Terry Austin,
and Chris Claremont

And I’ve been waiting on this…the first Frank Miller issue of Daredevil!

Daredevil #158, May 1979
Frank Miller, Klaus Janson,
and Roger McKenzie

And I’ve been waiting on this…the first Frank Miller issue of Daredevil!

Daredevil #158, May 1979
Frank Miller, Klaus Janson,
and Roger McKenzie

I hate to disappoint, but…

I hate to disappoint, but…

…and that’s the story of how Trish lost her left arm.

Incredible Hulk #234, April 1979
Sal Buscema, Jack Abel,
and Roger Stern

…and that’s the story of how Trish lost her left arm.

Incredible Hulk #234, April 1979
Sal Buscema, Jack Abel,
and Roger Stern